HOME COMMUNITY SPINAL INJURY FACT SHEETS RESEARCH MOBILITY LEISURE



 

Spinal-Injury.net :  Disabled Cruises


 

Disabled Cruises: Disabled Cruises are a popular choice of holiday for many wheelchair users and those with other mobility problems.  Most cruise liners have a number of modern wheelchair accessible cabins to book. Generally speaking the newer the ship the better the overall accommodation and access will be.  Getting accurate information about the accessibility of cruises isn't always easy.  A good tip is to find the name of the actual ship the disabled cruises company is using and do a separate Search for it on the internet.

Another  good idea when seeking to book disabled cruises is to get hold of the publications issued about your disability or general disability papers / magazines and look through the advertisements sections.  They often carry adverts from properly accessible disabled cruises.
 
Most high street travel agents or even Internet booking agents only have limited accessibility information on their computers.  They can however contact the disabled cruises ship directly on your behalf to get more detailed information for you.  If you can, talk directly on the boat or who has actually been aboard before. A lot of the bigger high street travel agents keep details of all door widths, ramps and other access information  on their computers now.  

Most cruises actually start at an airport, since few of us live in a port city. Modern cruise ships load from large (hopefully) watertight doors on the side, just above the waterline. These permit wide ramps with handrails for passengers and can even serve as a dock should a tender be needed in a port of call. If the cruise ship is docked at a large terminal, you  can actually ride across the gangway in your wheelchair to the cabin. Where gangways with steps have been necessary, the ship's hands carry the wheelchair aboard.  At docks with no main gangway access and tender access only it may be possible to take the wheelchair on the tenders, when the ship is anchored out in a bay. There are always ship's crew at the gangway and tender to assist disabled people. In fact, there are always ship's crew everywhere aboard the ship, which is another one of the benefits of disabled cruises.

Holiday Guide
Booking a Hotel Room
Villas and Apartments
Flying Tips
Cruise Holidays
Local Transport
 

Back to top

Spinal-Injury.net :  Disabled Cruises

 

 
HOME COMMUNITY SPINAL INJURY FACT SHEETS RESEARCH MOBILITY LEISURE

Copyright 2002-2015 Spinal-Injury Network. All rights reserved. Cookie Policy