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Spinal-Injury.net :  Spinal Cord Injury - Heterotopic Ossification

 
 

Heterotopic Ossification

Heterotopic ossification is a condition not well understood that occurs in acute spinal cord injury and consists of the laying down of bone outside the normal skeleton, usually occurring at large joints such as the hips or knees. The primary problem with Heterotopic ossification, or HO, is the risk for joint stiffening and fusion. Should the hip or knee become fused in a certain position, a surgical release is necessary to allow range of motion to occur. Unfortunately, it takes between 12 and 18 months for Heterotopic bone to mature once it has developed. Activities that are used to prevent the development of HO include range of motion programs and other functional activities that move the joints within a functional range. Currently treatment is limited with the exception of preventing the joint fusion (termed ankylosis)

Skin Breakdown
pneumonia
Osteoporosis and Fractures
Heterotopic Ossification
Spasticity
Urinary Tract Infections
Autonomic Dysreflexia
Deep Vein Thrombosis
Pulmonary Embolism
Orthostatic Hypotension
Cardiovascular Disease
Syringomyelia
Neuropathic / Spinal Cord Pain
Medication Problems
Hyperthermia
Hypothermia
 


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Spinal-Injury.net :  Spinal Cord Injury - Heterotopic Ossification

 
 

 
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