HOME COMMUNITY SPINAL INJURY FACT SHEETS RESEARCH MOBILITY LEISURE



 

Spinal-Injury.net :  Spinal Cord Injury - Orthostatic Hypotension

 
 

Orthostatic Hypotension

Orthostatic Hypotension - occurs when there is an inability for the circulatory system to adapt to moving to an upright position. When
an individual sits with the legs lowered, the body's blood pools in the lower extremities. Blood pressure drops and the individual feels dizzy, light-headed or like they are going to faint. They may also have a tingling or burning in the legs or a fast heart rate. Rising slower will help, but elastic stockings, ace wraps and an elastic abdominal binder are necessary to assist the body with blood circulation. Orthostatic hypertension is most often felt after injury. It may take days to regain the ability to sit upright. Early treatment with range of motion to the limbs, use of a reclining wheelchair with elevating foot rests, and a tilt table are some of the treatments to help the patient adapt. A change in therapy later in rehabilitation, may also contribute to the condition. With treatment, the condition eventually resolves.

Skin Breakdown
pneumonia
Osteoporosis and Fractures
Heterotopic Ossification
Spasticity
Urinary Tract Infections
Autonomic Dysreflexia
Deep Vein Thrombosis
Pulmonary Embolism
Orthostatic Hypotension
Cardiovascular Disease
Syringomyelia
Neuropathic / Spinal Cord Pain
Medication Problems
Hyperthermia
Hypothermia


Back to top
 

Spinal-Injury.net :  Spinal Cord Injury - Orthostatic Hypotension

 
 

 
HOME COMMUNITY SPINAL INJURY FACT SHEETS RESEARCH MOBILITY LEISURE

Copyright 2002-2015 Spinal-Injury Network. All rights reserved. Cookie Policy